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  1. Book Notes – Ohio Photographers 1839-1900

    Book Notes – Ohio Photographers 1839-1900

    Ohio Photographers 1839-1900. By Diane VanSkiver Gagel.  (2013.  Pp. 371.  $42.75. Paperback. Baltimore: Clearfield Company for Genealogical Publishing Company.  ISBN: 978-0-8063-5669-3.) www.genealogical.com Statewide resources on early photography are few and far between.  A brief check of OCLC’s WorldCat shows just six states with statewide directories, a clue to how difficult and time consuming it can be to research and document early American photographers.  This work, compiled by Diane VanSkiver Gagel, showcases the lives and work of Ohio photographers between 1839 and 1900.  During this period, the technology of photography changed from daguerreotype to glass plate negative, and the studio itself...

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  2. Book Notes – The Kentucky Barbecue Book

    Book Notes – The Kentucky Barbecue Book

    The Kentucky Barbecue Book. By Wes Berry.  (2013.  Pp. 356.  $27.95. Hardcover. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  663 South Limestone Street, Lexington KY 40508-4008. www.kentuckypress.com) ISBN: 978-0-8131-4179-4. For those of us who survived the Kentucky winter of 2013/14, we continue to embrace every second of summer that is humanly possible. Since summer in Kentucky usually means picnics, get-togethers, and cooking outdoors, an exploration of Kentucky’s barbecue industry seems like a perfect fit. Although, you might be asking why we would feature a barbecue book on a site that focuses on Kentucky Ancestry/History. That is the beauty of this book: It not...

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  3. Book Notes – The Land We Dreamed

    Book Notes – The Land We Dreamed

    The Land We Dreamed. By Joe Survant.  (2014.  Pp. 133.  $19.95.  Paper. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  663 South Limestone Street, Lexington KY 40508-4008. www.kentuckypress.com) ISBN: 978-0-8131-4458-0. As our pedigree charts grow backward toward Kentucky’s early settlement days, and as we celebrate the “memory” of those we have never met, the lack of recorded personal experiences becomes glaring. History is full of personal accounts, including those from Kentucky’s earliest days, yet even those extant lack internal dialogue or reflection. If only we could catch a glimpse into the thought life of those who inhabited, explored, or settled Kentucky in the centuries...

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  4. Book Notes – Captives in Blue: The Civil War Prisons of the Confederacy

    Book Notes – Captives in Blue: The Civil War Prisons of the Confederacy

    Captives in Blue: The Civil War Prisons of the Confederacy. By Roger Pickenpaugh.  (2013.  Pp. 320.  $49.95.  Hardcover. Lexington: University of Alabama Press.  Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0380. http://www.uapress.ua.edu/) ISBN: 978-0817317836. A follow-up to Pickenpaugh’s earlier publication, Captives in Gray: The Civil War Prisons of the Union (2008), this book uses soldier diaries, newspaper accounts, and military records to tell the story of Confederate prisoner-of-war policies, prison conditions, and the experiences of individual prisoners. Moving chronologically, Pickenpaugh starts in Richmond, Virginia, as prisoners-of-war were transported to the Confederate capital after the first battles of the Civil War, and then discusses the efforts to establish...

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